missingaudrey:

Audrey Hepburn photographed by Milton Greene, 1955

missingaudrey:

Audrey Hepburn photographed by Milton Greene, 1955


Audrey Hepburn on the set of War and Peace, 1955
Audrey Hepburn on the set of War and Peace, 1955

cinemove:

Sophia Loren in A Countess From Hong Kong (1967)

ohmarlenemarlene:

*sigh* Joan Crawford *sigh again*

ohmarlenemarlene:

*sigh* Joan Crawford *sigh again*

gatabella:

Marlene Dietrich during the filming of Martin Roumagnac

gatabella:

Marlene Dietrich during the filming of Martin Roumagnac

vivienleighforever:

"In every generation there was a woman who gripped the imagination of the Continent. Today it is Vivien Leigh, because of her greatness as an actress, because of her personality and charm and in spite of her good looks." 
- Orson Welles

vivienleighforever:

"In every generation there was a woman who gripped the imagination of the Continent. Today it is Vivien Leigh, because of her greatness as an actress, because of her personality and charm and in spite of her good looks."

- Orson Welles

barbarastanwyck:

Norma Shearer in The Stolen Jools (1931)


Lauren Bacall, Harper’s Bazaar, May 1943 (Louise Dahl-Wolfe)

Lauren Bacall, Harper’s Bazaar, May 1943 (Louise Dahl-Wolfe)

(Source: dansunevillemorte)

(Source: karinacupcake)

Before shooting began on Pillow Talk, Doris Day and Marty Melcher, her third husband, launched weekly informal dinner parties for the cast and crew at their house on North Crescent Drive, in the flats of Beverly Hills. In her efforts to make the insecure Rock Hudson feel more at home in a comic role, Day remained on the set when he filmed their split-screen telephone scenes to read him her lines, and during the pre-recording session for the title song, in which Hudson was to join her in the chorus, she spontaneously suggested, “Why don’t you sing a verse?”

He later said he had been expecting someone “as warm as a December night on an ice floe.” But, as Day herself recalled, “the very first day on the set, I discovered we had a performing rapport that was remarkable. We played our scenes together as if we had once lived them.” Their compatibility should have been foreseeable, for they had much in common. Like Day, Hudson was riddled with doubts and insecurities, stemming from a miserable childhood. When he was still Roy Harold Scherer Jr., his father abandoned him, and his mother and stepfather abused him emotionally and physically. At bottom, Hudson was no more the All-American Male than Day was the Girl Next Door. They soon came up with nicknames for each other. He became Ernie; she was either Eunice or Maude. In the course of shooting, Day adopted Hudson’s habit of doing crossword puzzles during downtime on the set. She, in turn, wanted to teach him how to play tennis, but he didn’t take her up on the offer. Hudson later recalled, “They had to add a week on to the shooting schedule because we could not stop laughing I used to think about terrible things, to try not to laugh, but I think that’s the wonderful part about when you see two people on the screen—if you like them, if they like each other, and you sense that they like each other.”

When Pillow Talk opened, in October 1959, the reviewers welcomed it as a new modern comedy and embraced Day and Hudson as a natural team. It was the No. 1 film for a couple of months.

(Source: mattybing1025)